17 responses

  1. paul nunan
    December 3, 2012

    I always love these stories of people who travel and their insights into travel.I have lived in China for nearly 10 years and usually go travelling twice a year for a few weeks.When i read this story I was left pondering when the time will come and I stop working and just travel until i have had enough.I have truly met the most interesting people travelling and also some of my ex-pat friends over the years have been inspiring.And the best advice is definetely to halve what you have decided to take before you leave and listen to others but not necessarily be influenced by their thoughts on travelling.My only advice would be to always go back to your favourite places and mix up your travelling between travelling solo and with your wife and your kids at times even when your kids are adults.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      December 10, 2012

      That bit about listening to others but not necessarily be influenced by them is something I completely agree with you about. Something independent travel teaches you very early on.

  2. Jesse
    December 3, 2012

    Congratulation indeed. What an amazing achievement even for a single man to reached.

  3. Jan
    December 3, 2012

    Such a journey. I always admire people who inspire to take on a quest like this. Alone, and then to find his wife after so many years!

  4. Jason
    December 3, 2012

    Hey Dave, hope your doing well mate. You know I always enjoy these reads and Emilio is one that I’ve read about over the years during my scouring on the net.

    There’s something inert in all of the great modern travellers that just keeps them moving forward and through all the good and bad times they continue to keep moving. I think it’s a fascinating subject. In a way I think people such as this are so hungry for the journey and the adventure that they basically portion large parts of their life to their passion.

    I can speak from experience when I say that you really have to have a bit of selfishness to remain on track with an endeavour such as Emilio’s and I don’t mean that in a bad way.

    You basically have to give up many things in life and direction all of your funds towards your goal. To complete a journey such as this is not cheap and I am not sure on Emilio’s financial history but I’m sure it has left him penniless at the end despite and sponsorship he may have received. The cost of Visa’s alone would far surpass what many people spend in a lifetime of travel.

    I also enjoyed his attitude towards taking in what others say, but take it on face value and go and find your own answers as everyone see’s the world differently.

    There is one thing that I feel Emilio may have not have faced as much in his time on the road. In years gone by I feel that the overland routes of the world were actually far easier in a bureaucratic sense to achieve. The period from the 60’s to the 80’s saw and endless supply of open borders for the overlander.

    Today, most of Africa has become a nightmare for the overland traveler, with all but a few routes open that can even be considered mildly safe to travel. The conflicts of the middle east have also created somewhat of a nightmare as well. Sorry mate, off on a bit of a tangent there.

    Emilio, if you read this mate. I congratulate you on staying the course and seeing the world in your own way and in your own time.

    A worthy inductee Dave….

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      December 10, 2012

      Hey Jason, nursing a torn calf muscle but other than that pretty good.

      Fully agree about the selfishness side of things. I think the likes of Shackleton et al highlight this in their final journals. Though they had families etc they still went forth for the goal was what made them what they were.

      I also agree about the current visa/bureaucratic scenario. Indeed a person traveling today had to jump through more hoops than a person 20 years ago. Indeed, even 10 or in some cases 5. China this year being a prime example. It’s easy to zip in and out of some places, SEA, but Africa like you wrote or Russia et al are complete steel walls for independent travel today.

  5. Liv
    December 4, 2012

    Interesting! I will definitely read his book :)

  6. James
    December 4, 2012

    It’s stories like this that make me also want to get up and go. Thanks for introducing me to Emilio.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      December 10, 2012

      Take a read through the rest in the Great Modern Travelers section, there’s a lot of inspiration in there.

  7. Marian
    December 4, 2012

    Great to see people like this highlighted, we need more of them in the world

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      December 10, 2012

      Fully agree!

  8. Tony
    December 4, 2012

    I have a old BMW, wouldn’t be up to this. Not sure how anyone could ride for a week let alone 10 years! The man must have a backbone of steel!

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      December 10, 2012

      Ha ha, I imagine his body adapted. Otherwise, it’s gonna be a painful one.

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