21 responses

  1. Debbie
    May 2, 2013

    The Chinese are ruthless. This is why they are successful in buying everything. The price is so much more than financial though.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      May 4, 2013

      Yes, the fact that management is often Chinese and regular workers in many cases doesn’t bode well for the local community.

  2. Carlos
    May 2, 2013

    Interesting article considering the current global economic downturn. With western migration on the rise it’s unique to see people moving to developing countries to live. I wonder how long this will last?

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      May 4, 2013

      Most of the people I’ve met don’t survive very long. After a year or two excuses often pop up and they head home. It’s easy to say you can live an work in a developing country independently – doing it long term is something else.

      Overall I see a crack down happening.

  3. Inga
    May 2, 2013

    It’s information like this that’s hard to find anywhere else. Thanks for writing about it. Always a joy to read .

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      May 4, 2013

      Thanks Inga.

  4. Tamanna Shaikh
    May 2, 2013

    My friend’s brother wants to go Nepal and me & my friend searching this details about job in Nepal. Thanks for sharing this, we are very much happy to read your post.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      May 4, 2013

      Glad to help Tamanna, I hope they find something.

  5. Sophie
    May 2, 2013

    Very interesting perspective. I keep thinking about living abroad in a far away place. Thinking my degree will open doors for me in a place like Nepal. Thinking I can help local people and have a better quality of life myself.

    Do you think this is possible? It seems everyone wants this but end up going home or settling for less. I know it’s worth a try but maybe not if it’s taking a job from someone.

    Is it really such a dog eat dog works out there?

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      May 4, 2013

      I think it’s tough out there alright. There are plenty of people who will do whatever it takes to survive. Be it copy your work, steal it, or in some cases physically take your business. That said, don’t let things discourage you. Working for an international organisation will give you a protective barrier for long-term employment.

      If you are unsure, then you can always try something for 6-12 months to get a better idea. No long-term commitments. I think it works well like that rather than telling everyone you are going “forever”.

    • Jeetendra
      July 20, 2013

      Sophie,there are foreigners in Nepal staying for overs 50 years as well,though few. As for you,you should give it a try.Natural beauty is a big fascination. Cheers :)

  6. Daryl
    May 2, 2013

    Does the UN really have a large presence in Nepal peace keeping?

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      May 4, 2013

      Not so much with peacekeeping since “peace” was declared. When there are elections they help in monitoring etc. The main role for the UN is with UNHCR (Human rights). Health is another sector as Nepal has some serious issues in term’s of possibly outbreaks and currently endemics.

  7. Marc
    May 13, 2014

    A question if you dont mind! My GF is being sent to Kathmandu to work for Save the Children for 6 months and Im going with her.
    Im a Massage Therapist and I know there are many “legit” Massage Spa’s in Kathmandu… Do you think it would be hard to find a Massage job? And without being “legal” to work since she is only on a 6 month contract, thus it would probably take that long just for me to try and become legal…
    Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
    Cheers

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      May 13, 2014

      There’s very little chance of getting a job as a paid masseuse in Kathmandu as a foreigner. You could volunteer for sure. Or if you have a contact at a large hotel in Kathmandu with a spa then there’s also a chance. Normally there’s an abundance of people looking for this work.

      • Marc
        May 15, 2014

        Sigh… Thanks for the info!

  8. Karen
    May 30, 2014

    Hi Dave,
    I was curious about the medical field over there? I have been a nurse for 25 years and going back to school to add another field to my resume; midwifery. What would be my chances of getting a job?

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      May 30, 2014

      Hi Karen,

      That’s an interesting question. There’s no shortage of doctors in hospitals in urban Nepal. There is in rural as they all leave for the big city or overseas. Nurses are similar in regards to government hospitals. There’s also a bevy of foreign Aid doctors and nurses here working in NGO’s, WHO etc.

      So it’s a tough field to break into. Best bet would be in the private clinics and hospitals or indeed WHO if you have contacts there. It’s competitive there. Volunteer wise you’d have no problem at all. But getting a “regular” job might be an issue unless you have medical contacts over there already.

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