23 responses

  1. Furio
    April 3, 2012

    Hey Dave,

    impressive pic : – )

    I know your blog is more about traveling than photography. However it would be awesome if you tell us how you take this pic. Which lens did you use? Is an HDR? Which lens did you use? Any particular challenge to take such a large panorama up to 5,000 meters?

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      April 4, 2012

      Hi Furio,

      Thank you.

      Good point and thank you for suggesting it. I actually write up photography info in my newsletter. I’m not sure if you subscribe or not so I don’t know if that’s the sort of information you where thinking would be good to write up here?

      But yes, I’ll certainly take what you say on board. Once I finish doing this series I’ll update the gallery and add in more “technical” information.

      Biggest challenge to taking a photo over 5,000m? Keep the the camera steady and stopping batteries from freezing!

  2. Nate
    April 3, 2012

    Damn! Great photo, incredible location. The weather and light was good to you at this moment!

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      April 4, 2012

      Ha ha, the wind was beating me up like an over sized Mike Tyson!

  3. Synz
    April 3, 2012

    Great shot! I’ve been dreaming on climbing Mt. Everest, but it seems impossible.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      April 4, 2012

      Depends on circumstances. But yes the price of climbing Mount Everest Financially is pretty high. Base camp on the other hand is a lot more feasible!

  4. Jesse
    April 4, 2012

    In this kind of photoshoots, my first impression is that these mountains are easy to hike. But realizing how many you’ll have to struggle is already chillin my bones to fear.

  5. Jason
    April 4, 2012

    Dave, with all the hard work and all the effort. Although you have posted this image for others to see (and what a great shot it is to). This image is for you mate. For when you are old and withered and sitting back reminiscing of days gone by. It will be days such as those when you stood on Kala Patthar that made life worth living.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      April 8, 2012

      Not sure I’ll make it too old and withered! But yes it’s one I’ll be printing out for special place alright!

  6. the candy trail … | Michael Robert Powell
    April 5, 2012

    Yeah, a stunner! Jason’s right-on: a great life reaffirmation. So, when you find “a home” it’ll be great to print it large for a wall, for your memories and for visitors to admire …

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      April 8, 2012

      I guess I’ve got to find one of those bit printers so! Then I can stare at the photo and grumble about not being able to walk up some stairs!

      • the candy trail … | Michael Robert Powell
        April 8, 2012

        Hopefully in our old age stairs will be a thing of the past as we zip-up heights in personal jet-packs … maybe a great way to scale Everest, while drinking beer 😉

  7. Kristina
    April 7, 2012

    Nice! Beautiful panormama. I can always pick Everest out in a photo because it’s the one with the clouds streaming off the top (and little snow at the top).

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      April 8, 2012

      That’s true, there’s nearly always some clouds atop Everest! Imagine climbing it only to see clouds!!

  8. Christine | GrrrlTraveler
    April 8, 2012

    Absolutely gorgeous photo. Got my vote! I like that you named the mountains. Without that, I would’ve thought it was all Everest. (sometimes, my lightbulb doesn’t go on)

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      April 14, 2012

      The mountain naming was difficult task! No one’s disagreed about Kali Himal yet so I guess it’s correct!

  9. Christine | GrrrlTraveler
    April 8, 2012

    ps. what kind of lens did you use? Did you really get that in all one shot?

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      April 14, 2012

      The photograph is actually a panorama stitched from four photographs. The reason for this is that by doing it this way you can actually zoom in very close and pick up a lot of detail on the mountains. It’s over 100mb and I did think of using a program that would display it so you could zoom in and out while panning around. But I just don’t have the internet bandwidth in Nepal to work with data that big.

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