38 responses

  1. Wade | VagabondJourney.com
    October 15, 2013

    Excellent article. This could be said for much of the “developing” world. Are we ready for this?

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      October 17, 2013

      Hey Wade, yep most developing countries certainly have a familiarity to them in terms of living there. Developed countries are a whole other kettle of fish though.

    • Jody
      November 15, 2013

      Yes indeed! I spent some time in the ‘developing world’. I worked in the construction business and my primary motive was money. I had to feed my wife and children. The above article as you say Wade could be applied to many countries. I am an old man and am quite comfortable living here in NYC. I still miss Africa to some degree, However I do not miss the pollution, the dirty water, the in your face corruption, and the list goes on and on.

      I guess the thing I miss most of all are the smiles,, the attitude, and the spirituality that comes with having nothing. That is not to say that materialism is not alive and well in ‘developing countries’. Quite the contrary.

      I wonder what Eight Finger Eddie would think of present day Istanbul or Kathmandu. I read a few chapters of his crazy book. What a laugh. Perhaps it is a good thing that times have changed. I guess Paddy Fisher started the ball rolling back in the 1950’s with The Indiaman. I actually knew a few Irish engineers who traveled on Paddy’s bus while working on contract in India . Such innocent times.

      I find that change is also the thrust of the article but I guess we have no choice but to accept that the world is changing fast . It is surely a sign of the times that we will be able to move ships where Henry Hudson and other floundered in ice.

  2. Sandy
    October 15, 2013

    Thanks for the honesty. There’s no point in trying to live somewhere you dream about without knowing what you’ll wake up to every day.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      October 17, 2013

      Nice comment. Yes many people dream (which is good) but unless they know what they are getting into it can end up being a nightmare. Better to be prepared.

  3. Claire
    October 15, 2013

    A very interesting and informative read. I too think many people don’t put enough time into preparing for a move like this to a developing country.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      October 17, 2013

      The “developing” country theme is as important to moving there as it is for people from there moving to “developed” countries I think.

  4. Janice
    October 15, 2013

    I always enjoyed your posts especially when it touches the country I love a lot.

    While I’m not familiar with the politics and business and living long term in Nepal (have been thinking about it for a long time), I do recognise some of the problems that you have stated as I have saw it for myself especially about the drugs and the country getting dirtier than previous.

    On the other hand, the warmth that Nepalis have given me made me wanting to go back again and again, so much so I would really love to move over. Your article however gave me a heads-up on what to expect and I will prepare myself by finding out more from my Nepali friends.

    Thanks and keep writing :-) I’m heading to the beloved land tomorrow coincidentally.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      October 17, 2013

      Hi Janice, thanks for the kind words.

      One thing I’d like to add. Unless you are Nepalese there’s only so much you can learn from Nepalese people about living there. That might seem strange but as I’m sure you know differing castes will have differing outlooks on Nepal. Moreover you’re not Nepalese so what might effect them might not bother you and vice verse. Just something to keep in mind :)

      Meanwhile I hope you have a great trip to Nepal!!

  5. Malcom
    October 15, 2013

    Thanks for putting so much of this together. I don’t want to live anywhere else but it’s great to see information like this coming out. It’ll stop the daydreams waking up to a nightmare.

    Plan, plan, plan.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      October 17, 2013

      All good point’s Malcom. Daydreams & nightmares. Plan to wake up a little wiser!

  6. regina
    October 15, 2013

    Thanks for an extremely interesting and thoughtful report, (even if I’ve never considered living in Nepal, and never will!) But how about you? Ready to move on?? Safe travels!

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      October 17, 2013

      Thanks Regina. Moving on for work etc once that’s done I’ll venture to some new places I think!

  7. Mike
    October 15, 2013

    Great insight Dave. You can’t get information like this anywhere else. So my hat’s off to you.

    I would try Nepal for 6 months of a year if I could. Just not sure my old bones would like the cold so much.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      October 17, 2013

      Thanks Mike. Six months sounds about right to get a good feel for a place. Try from April on for better (warmer) weather in Nepal

  8. Tom
    October 16, 2013

    Never looked further than India myself. It seems in Asia money is the key to being able to buy land or rights.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      October 17, 2013

      I think most places are about money these days.

      However in terms of rights. Considering most of Europe, USA, Australia all allow foreigners to become citizens and own land in some form it does seem biased that in Africa / Asia it’s the opposite.

  9. Anna’s World
    October 16, 2013

    All of this is so interesting. How to live in Nepal vs How to live anywhere in Asia … Are there a lot of differences in the countries regarding your rights etc?

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      October 17, 2013

      From what I see all of East Asia aside from Malaysia will not allow a foreigner to become a citizen or own land. And even then Malaysia wants USD $250,000 for their my second home plan.

  10. Pradeep
    October 16, 2013

    Not only foreigners, sometimes even we become the victim of high pricing (while living out from home, buying some stuffs and spending cash on beverages and entertainments ). Definitely Kathmandu has changed a lot, pollution is the most(i was born in here). This year i went to Pokhara and it was my 10th time. I noticed a lot of changes in Pokhara. High priced hotels,hazard settlements with unmanaged road and traffics.
    The thing is everything this blog holds is true.I’m pretty sure that you have stayed long enough in Nepal :)

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      October 17, 2013

      Good points Pradeep. I tentatively avoided mentioning what’s it like to live in Nepal as a Nepalese person as I’m not Nepalese. It tends to open up a whole other can of worms so to speak. But yes, you do bring up a great point of when a national moves away from the city or region they were born in to a new area. That too can result in greater prices, abrupt changes and social integration problems.

      Hopefully in the not too distant future I can open up that discussing to Nepalese people and let them right here about what they think about living in Nepal! :) should be interesting!!

  11. bernie
    October 23, 2013

    Hi Dave. very interesting!! more so as i had reading some one saying how good it would be to live there!! How you can buy land & houses! unlike he said Thailand where the guy lives! Said he would move there if his Thai wife would go!! lol.

  12. Hannah
    October 31, 2013

    Such an informative entry of Nepal. Hopefully we could squeeze this in our itinerary!

  13. Mark
    November 1, 2013

    Really interesting piece. I’ve not lived in Nepal but I go back again and again, and it’s easily my favourite country to travel in, so I can imagine many of the frustrations and the highs you describe.

    Quite a few westerners working in the tourist industry (guides, trek leaders, tour operators, etc.) live in Nepal during the tourist seasons of Feb-Jun and Sep-Nov. It seems to me they have the best of both worlds being able to dip in and out, spending much of their lives in a fantastic country but able to “escape” back home from time to time.

    Thanks for all the stuff you’ve written about Nepal over the last few months. I’ve really enjoyed reading it; you’re providing a great service.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      November 2, 2013

      That may be the very best way to enjoy the best of Nepal – stay for a few months only! It’s a hard country to stop returning to that’s for sure.

      Thanks for the kind words. Hopefully the upcoming elections will steer Nepal in the right direction so we’ll all be heading back again soon.

  14. Jamie S.
    November 15, 2013

    I have to admit, my idea, or better to say illusion, of Nepal has been partly shattered by your post, but it stays on my bucket list nonetheless. Not planning to put down roots there so I should be ok.. I guess I´m just going to wander from one temple to another focusing on recharging my batteries and not thinking too much about what real life is like in Nepal. Hopefully, it does not sound too egocentric:)

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      March 13, 2015

      Sure, I hope you had a great time

  15. Justin
    November 26, 2013

    I’ll be going to Nepal next year. This has been a great read in preparing. I’m going to be working with a local sustainable agriculture co-op just outside Pokhara. It’s a non-pay volunteer position via a friend at the UNHCR (but not a UN position) as it involves women in the workplace. Reading through your website has given me a lot to mull over. Just wanted to say thanks!

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      March 13, 2015

      Glad you found the site helpful Justin. I hope you project went well.

  16. Ronny
    February 16, 2014

    Very through … having been in Indonesia for a while now, I understand the sentiment of the many challenges and frustrations that crop up from time to time…

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      March 13, 2015

      Yes, many things cross over no matter the country.

  17. Daya Kharel
    March 30, 2014

    Enjoyed your article. As you said, foreigners are considered rich, yes it’s true. I am from Nepal and when we were kids, we used to think the same way. Still people think that developed countries are like the heaven, unless they go abroad. You have difficulties there in one way and others have difficulties somewhere else. I think, as a foreigner, everyone has hard time living outside of their countries. At least most Nepalese respect foreigners really well (except the exceptions :)

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      March 13, 2015

      It certainly works both ways. It doesn’t matter where someone is from there will always be issues when moving to another country. It’s how plausible it is to actually live there for good that things come down to in the end.

  18. Marco
    May 26, 2014

    Hi Dave, If I recall correctly, you went back to Nepal thinking you might have found home there, apparently it seems you gave up on that idea? Now you’re in Thailand, are you considering finding home there? Would be great to hear an update about your personal story and what motivates you to go where you go. You should also try Cambodia if Thailand doesn’t work for you. I tried living in the Philippines but found Cambodia much more welcoming.
    Best Regards, Marco

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      March 13, 2015

      Hi Marco,

      I did an interview recently about this. The answer is I’d love to live in Nepal. The problem is bureaucracy. I will never be allowed to be a resident, own land or vote. Whereas a Nepalese person who moves to the USA/Europe/Australia can, eventually, do those things. It’s a hard pill to swallow.

      Moreover a dangerous one to try and swallow as many have and have choked on the reality of moving to such a place. I can certainly stay a long time in Nepal. This is no problem. But in regards to actually being able to live there, legally. It seems Nepal (and most of Asia) don’t want that to happen for “foreigners”.

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