Leaving Palawan going to …

by The Longest Way Home ~ December 30th, 2009. Published in: Travel blog » Philippines.
Evening nights in Palawan (click to enlarge)

Evening nights in Palawan (click to enlarge)

My living on an island series is now over. It’s time to leave Palawan, and travel on. I’ve already written enough about the place to say that’s it’s very nice, but it’s not me.  The living on an island part anyway. I hope my travel journals from there will have helped anyone else thinking of a similar thing.

It’s certainly given me a chance to do a lot of writing, photo processing,  thinking and planning. The latter I seem to get better at the closer to an end date I get to.

Before living in Palawan, and during I’ve traveled, to other parts of the Philippines, including Mindanao which I far preferred over Palawan. More on that soon.

Meanwhile I’m headed to my second choice island further south. Just to see if I made the right choice in Palawan. We’ll see …

As I pack my bags from the island that was my temporary home I do so with a heavy weight in my chest. What’s worse is the longing that builds up and releases itself.

When staying in a place for longer than a week or two my mind links a connection to it as home.

A fake kind of reassurance that maybe this is it. While at the same time it hides the fact that it’s not home.

These are the unwritten symptoms of long term travel, I feel.

My timer on the right hand side is soon to strike 5 years.

I didn’t think it would take this long. And now, I’m saying goodbye to another potential that never was. A coincidence … I hope so. I have to think so. These times are not easy.

Saying farewell to Palawan (click to enlarge)

Saying farewell to Palawan (click to enlarge 800x600)

Coming soon:

Five years of travel and what it can do to you

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9 Great responses to Leaving Palawan going to …

  1. Rachel says:

    “When staying in a place for longer than a week or two my mind links a connection to it as home. ” – This quote has really struck a cord in me, and I really can feel the longing in it. While my story isn’t anything quite like yours, I think i can relate to the longing for “home”. I often feel more at home living abroad in Hong Kong but I wonder if it’s just a shallow connection, or the real thing. I felt it after two weeks, and considered it a honeymoon period. I feel like i could leave here now and go to the next place and maybe after 2 weeks, be home again… anyway, i’m rambling. just wanted to say your quote struck something in me. happy holidays to you and best wishes in your next location – can’t wait to read about it.

    • -Rachel- Hi Rachel, thanks for taking the time to stop by and leave a comment. Yes the feeling one gets during that “honeymoon” period is often a great one, but not altogether a true one. I know there have been places I felt an instant appeal too, only later to see cracks developing in that first feeling. It can be difficult. But I do know that there is also a great feeling of knowing when it does come true. It can’t be forced this I know. And we don’t know until we try. Therefore in my eyes, you can do no wrong in searching.

      I wish you the very best, looking forward to hearing from you again.

  2. flip says:

    happy new year!

    wishing you only one thing, that one day you wake up and realize that you’re finally home…


  3. Sonya says:

    Happy New Year! Thank you for a truly inspiring travel blog. In my rolling stone life, I completely relate to your travel experience and motivations. What I’ve concluded is the concept of home and cultural identity continue to evolve.

    • -Sonya- Thanks for your comment, and Happy New Year to you too. Indeed, I agree, the concept of home continues to evolve along with ourselves as we travel, or indeed live our lives. It’s something important to remember and hold true to the forefront when traveling! Thanks for the kind words!

  4. Bruno says:

    Hi Dave, i went to your blog a bit; first best wishes for 2010 of course, and thank you for sharing everything here. When i read it, i can only nod my head when you say that the people and culture make a place “a home”… and not the view, climat…. I hope you will find your home one day… but maybe you have “itching feet”…
    Dave, i will be in El Nido in a few weeks. Do you think its wise to take anti-malaria pils?

    Salamat po at ingat ka Dave

    • -Bruno- Hi Bruno, Thanks for the good wishes for 2010, and the same to you. Very glad we also share a similar thought towards “culture” and “home”.

      To answer your question. Itchy feet … sure. But not perpetual itchy feet. I don’t want to be a wandering nomad or the like. I want a place to call home. Once found, will I travel again. Sure, there’s no doubt. Will be be for 5 years straight? No way :)

      As for taking Malarial Pills. I’ve never taken them in The Philippines. I’ve met remote UN health workers who’ve been dealing with local Malaria cases. So it’s there in some form. However the best advice I can give you is to visit a Doctor specializing in tropical illnesses. They would be the best to advise in current health issues in The Philippines.

      All the very best in El Nido!!! It’s a fantastic place, I am sure you will enjoy.

      Safe Travels & Salamat

  5. matt says:

    … gypsy fever… truckers in the good ole USA sometimes go thru the looking glass n never stop truckin or want to… home is where you are at the moment… tis a gift from the universe that is why it is THE present. the best present of all-home. I’m guessing you are relatively young and still romantic, a charming persuasion you will evolve away from… perhaps not, but i sense an tendency towards honesty in you. and if you come to a fork in the road-take it !