38 responses

  1. James
    February 2, 2012

    Another great step by step guide. Sounds like a fantastic experience though. Interesting how you can’t get tickets direct from the airlines.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      February 3, 2012

      Hi James,

      Well I’ve asked, and you can buy direct from the airlines. But you’d have to located their main offices first. Some of them are quite spread out. Add in Nepal’s terrible electricity problem and even if you get to the office, they might not be able to book a ticket then and there. They might ask you to come back, and then there will be huge queues. Add in taxi fares, and how a lot of these offices are spread out, you probably will end up spending more buying from them directly than from an agent

  2. Nate Yomadic
    February 2, 2012

    Woah! Just this first instalment has taught me more than I ever knew about Everest Base Camp. I very wrongly assumed the journey to get there is not as epic, as it clearly is in reality. Looking forward to the rest of the story!

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      February 3, 2012

      I think a lot of it depends on the time of year you go. Peak season is full of tourists and charming weather. This is off peak and well that bit more adventurous. Stay tuned!

  3. Anna’s World
    February 2, 2012

    It’s all in the details! So many of them. Always wanted to know what Everest was like. Looking forward to this!

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      February 3, 2012

      Just keep in mind this is in the off season! It’s lot easier in peak season.

  4. Victoria
    February 2, 2012

    Love the tip about seeing the airport as an adventure. I feel that way about means of travel, regardless of how “mundane” it is perceived. Looking forward to reading the rest ;-)

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      February 3, 2012

      Hi Victoria,

      I saw quite a few people lose their cool at the airport. It just doesn’t get you very far in Nepal. One person even threatened to sue for being an hour late. People looked at him and laughed … Am sure you’ve seen it too! ;)

  5. Michael
    February 2, 2012

    The flight sounds very Indiana Jones!

  6. Thomas Lennard
    February 3, 2012

    Fantastic account of Lukla on the EBC. I remember the haphazard chaos at the airport along with seeing a few goats wandering around.

    That landing bump still sends shivers up my spine.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      February 3, 2012

      When the nose is up in the air you nearly envision going straight into the mountain when you land and it bumps … best not to think too much!

  7. Malcom
    February 3, 2012

    Looking forward to reading your account of Base Camp. Why go in the winter though?

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      February 3, 2012

      Because it adds to the adventure. No disrespect to peak season trekkers but I also find it too crowded then as well.

  8. Jakob
    February 3, 2012

    Fantastic written again! I like this sentence very much: “If the flight is the kind of crazy flight that you can only see in an adventure movie or crazy comedy”…I totally agree!

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      February 3, 2012

      Cheers Jakob. I don’t think I’ve ever had a flight like that. Not sure I want another one. But then again …

  9. Jason
    February 3, 2012

    Memories flooding back Dave. It’s been many years since I’ve graced the trails in that part of the world. The Lukla airport and the surrounding region seems to have gone a little upmarket in recent years. It was not a tarmac runway when I visited last and was purely loose rock and stone.

    That didn’t worry me though as we landed in a helicopter in the back yard of someones house next to the air port. Long story……..

    Looking forward to reading along on this one Dave.

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      February 3, 2012

      There’s even a mobile base station at Base Camp now. A couple of people have used it to tweet from the top of Mount Everest. Well, in between hand gliding from the top etc. One of the reasons I went in the off season – to avoid running into all that.

  10. Lauren K
    February 3, 2012

    Ah, already so helpful Dave. As someone who is terribly afraid of flying (despite having flown countless times all over the world) these details are beyond helpful and reassuring. When I do board that flight to Lukla in May, I will know what to expect. Very much looking forward to the next post.

  11. Shannon
    February 5, 2012

    While I’ll never trek since I can’t walk long distances I’m guessing you can see Everest much better from Lukla? What else is around Lukla that if one is not going to the base camp? Do they make boarding announcements in English? If not I wonder how you figured out which one was your flight? (unless you know some of their language).

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      February 8, 2012

      No, you can’t see Mount Everest from Lukla. You can take 15 minutes flights from Kathmandu. The first real physical sighting of Everest is a good day + trek from Lukla. See https://www.thelongestwayhome.com/blog/nepal/everest-base-camp-trek-day-2-first-glimpse-of-mount-everest/ to see the first look at Everest on the Trek.

      Yes, boarding announcements are in English.

      • Shannon
        February 9, 2012

        15 minutes? Kinda short! I want to land on that runway! haha, maybe I will have to do that just for the fun of it.

        Thanks for the info :)

      • Dave from The Longest Way Home
        February 9, 2012

        No problems Shannon. The flight to Lukla is quite a ride alright. Shame there’s not much to see around Lukla in terms of mountains without trekking. Though staying overnight there would still be interesting, as is watching the plane come in and take-off from this tiny airport.

        For view without trekking much, on the Annapurna circuit trek there’s now a road to Jomsom, and along the way some stunning mountain views ;)

  12. Leslie (Downtown Traveler)
    February 5, 2012

    What an amazing experience to hike Everest! That little plane sounds really crazy– I hope they have air sick bags :) Although, the adrenaline of thinking about the grand adventure you are about to embark on probably calms the nerves for many. Looks forward to hearing all about your experience!

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      February 8, 2012

      They have sick bags somewhere on the plane, really. Though if something goes wrong, it all ends a bit too quick for that! ;)

  13. hayadeen
    February 5, 2012

    *puking rainbow*

    ..dave, have fun and have a nice day..

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      February 8, 2012

      “Puking Rainbow” ??? Wait until take off ;)

  14. Christine | Grrrl Traveler
    February 8, 2012

    ooh, I didn’t know you had to fly to the base camp! That’s extra fees for the trek, huh? And I can’t imagine trekking Everest is cheap in itself. =(

    But cool in-flight roughing-it-style entertainment!

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      February 8, 2012

      You can also trek from Jiri and add on 5-8 days. Flying in costs between $120 and $160. A guide can cost you too if you’re not careful. Package deals add up. But it’s the people who buy package deals from big companies who really lose out on $$

  15. Sach
    February 15, 2012

    Did the EBC trek in November 2010. The best hike I’ve ever been on. Enjoy!

  16. Andreas
    April 9, 2012

    That’s why I love TLWH – brilliant :)

  17. Sigmond
    April 15, 2012

    You can take a day pack on board. We all did this last month. I guess it depends on the airline. Cheerio.

  18. parman
    January 22, 2013

    hi dave,, i need some information about lukla flights,, im planning to trek to EBC in May 26th this year..

    so,, if my arrival date in kathmandu is the day before (which is May 25th), do you think i can still get ticket for tomorrow flight (may 26th) to lukla? are they often sold out?

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      January 23, 2013

      Hi there,

      I got an email from you too I think so I’ll keep it brief. May is the start of the hot season and the end of the second busiest trekking time of year. There are multiple flights to Lukla everyday from Kathmandu. The problem is more to do with the weather. If it’s hazy, then flights might get cancelled. If not then you should be fine. I’ll give you a contact via email if you want to book a flight ahead.

  19. Rachel
    February 19, 2013

    Hi Dave – fab info, thanks so much for the time you’ve put into this! Just a quick question. I am planning to trek solo to EBC in November (thought it more sensible for me to go in tourist season in case I get into trouble, even though I’d rather be alone – ha ha!). Obviously I’ll have things well planned (map, gps, distances etc.) but I just wondered if the trail is pretty clear in general. I know that it gets a little hard to make out in the last couple of days before EBC but is it relatively straightforward without a guide? I know women do this solo but I am trying to gain as much info as possible. I appreciate you were probably in snow so might be difficult to answer but any advice would be fantastic. Thanks so much! Rachel :o)

    • Dave from The Longest Way Home
      February 19, 2013

      Hi Rachel,

      November is a good time to go, still some tourists but not as many as Sept/Oct!

      As for the trails, it only snowed when I reached basecamp so I got to see them all the way up. Let’s just say they are not marked out with sign posts all the way. As you have a map, compass/gps you should be okay so long as you’ve done some form of trekking before. There will be people around though. And asking at guesthouses along the way will help. Keep in mind English is not always spoken.

      The best thing is to have time on your side. Start early and end early. Travelling in the late afternoon or at night is really not advisable. Tagging along behind a group can help too. Do be aware of altitude sickness and the signs of it if you are going alone.

      If this is your first trek then I’d consider a guide, or a guide/porter. It will actually take some worry off your shoulders so you can enjoy the trek more. Otherwise it’s a case of a map, knowing how to read it, asking questions to people you see, knowing your own limitations and taking your time!

      I’ve written up some more about trekking to Everest base camp here. Check out the links in the side bars for more. Also my Travel Guide to Nepal and the side bar links there should help with Nepal in general.

      Hope this helps.

      Dave

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